Highland Blog https://www.highlandschool.org/page.cfm?p=840 Georgia Scarborough says "TWAWEZA!" (Swahili for "We Can!") https://www.highlandschool.org/page.cfm?p=840&eid=101 <p>From the beginning, Georgia Scarborough &lsquo;18 knew that she wanted women&rsquo;s health issues to be at the forefront of her Global Studies project. &nbsp;She had long been interested in the Enkijape School, Highland&rsquo;s sister school in Kenya, and after much research, settled on a project that combined both interests: She would research the United Nations- declared human rights crisis that is the menstruation taboo. Menstruation is a topic that is still globally stigmatized, but is particularly so in East Africa where the Enkijape School is located.</p> <p><img src="uploaded/themes/default/images/enkijape.girls.jpg" width="960" height="482"></p> <p>With guidance from her Global Studies advisors, Mrs. Marjorie Kuzminski and Ms. Phoebe Krumich, Georgia began investigating the issue. Her reading led her to a new understanding of the challenges many East African women face, and she shared her findings in an assembly presentation to upper school students and faculty in February 2018. Her riveting program outlined the shame and marginalization women face each month, and detailed how lack of access to adequate sanitary supplies keeps girls out of school on a regular basis. In Kenya, girls miss on average four days of school a month, and often drop out altogether. Georgia noted that women and girls often must use old rags or even mattress stuffing as absorbents, risking their health in the process.<span style="font-size: 1.0625em;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><img src="uploaded/themes/default/images/georgia.at.podium.jpg" width="630" height="945"></p> <p>Georgia&rsquo;s research led her to <a href="https://www.femmeinternational.org" target="_blank">Femme International</a>, a non-governmental organization headquartered in Canada, and committed to using education and conversation to break down the taboo on a global scale. By taking an education-based approach, Femme International tackles the issue at its root, seeking to end the gender disparity that results from myths which isolate and shame women during their monthly cycles. Their website features the hashtag #nomorelimits to underscore its goal of empowering healthy, confident women.</p> <p>So where does the Enkijabe School come into the picture? As part of her project, Georgia has partnered with Femme International to bring their program to Highland&rsquo;s sister school. Her goal is to raise enough money to provide a &ldquo;femme kit&rdquo; for 200 students and teachers there. Costing $35 (Canadian), each kit contains sustainable sanitary and cleaning supplies, and a workbook. Prior to distribution of the kits, students will receive education about the human body, and engage in guided conversations designed to break down taboos surrounding menstruation and gender. With an end date of August 2018, Georgia has already raised $1350 toward her goal of $7150. To learn more about Georgia's GoFundMe campaign or to make a donation, <a href="https://www.gofundme.com/femme-international-enkijape" target="_blank">please click here.<span style="font-size: 1.0625em;">&nbsp;</span></a><span style="font-size: 1.0625em;"></span></p> <p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/hL7CMxx3wYw?rel=0" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><br></p> <p>The goal of Highland&rsquo;s Global Studies Program is to &ldquo;produce global citizens who have acquired a deeper understanding of world cultures and global issues.&rdquo; [link to Highland webpage for Global Studies]. &nbsp;Georgia has not only acquired a deeper understanding of what it takes to produce the next generation of confident, healthy women, but has raised awareness in the Highland community by sharing her insights and pursuing a tangible goal for girls at Enkijape School. A Highland Lifer who dances professionally and runs her own photography business, she will matriculate at Elon University next fall.</p> <p><span>Thanks to Cathy Campbell for writing this post for the Highland blog. You can reach Cathy at&nbsp;</span><a href="mailto:%20ccampbell@highlandschool.org" target="_self">ccampbell@highlandschool.org</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Thu, 19 Jul 2018 13:19:11 EST The Power of Morning Meeting https://www.highlandschool.org/page.cfm?p=840&eid=100 <img src="uploaded/themes/default/images/responsive.classroom.blog.post.promo.jpg" width="800" height="510"> <div></div> <div> <div>In Highland's Lower School, teachers have embraced a way to engage students called Responsive Classroom. Students learn to develop empathy, assertiveness, responsibility, self-control, and cooperation. The approach emphasizes the integration of academic and social-emotional skills as the best preparation for student success. Teachers have a deep understanding of where each child is developmentally, and see parents as partners in the learning process.&nbsp;<a href="https://spark.adobe.com/page/qPApmStwVQcoG/" target="_blank">Click here to read more about her in this new post by Cathy Campbell.&nbsp;</a></div> <div><span style="font-size: 1.0625em;"><br></span></div> <div><span style="font-size: 1.0625em;">Thanks to Cathy Campbell for writing this post for the Highland blog. You can reach Cathy at&nbsp;</span><a href="mailto:%20ccampbell@highlandschool.org" target="_self" style="font-size: 1.0625em;">ccampbell@highlandschool.org</a></div> <div><a href="mailto:%20ccampbell@highlandschool.org" target="_self"></a></div> </div> Thu, 08 Feb 2018 15:30:38 EST On Call With Addie Norden '18 https://www.highlandschool.org/page.cfm?p=840&eid=99 <a href="https://spark.adobe.com/page/5k3zXk2OOm0HS/" target="_blank"><img src="https://www.highlandschool.org/uploaded/themes/default/images/addie.norden.blog.promo.image.jpg" width="1350" height="894"></a> <div></div> <div>Highland Senior Addison Norden '18 has been training with the Warrenton Volunteer Fire Company&nbsp;since she was a sophomore. She's completed intensive training to become an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT). She works all-night shifts on the weekends and has been running calls since February. Now, she's training to become certified as a firefighter. <a href="https://spark.adobe.com/page/5k3zXk2OOm0HS/" target="_blank">Click here to read more about her in this new post by Cathy Campbell.&nbsp;</a></div> <br> <div></div> <div><i><i><em>Thanks to Cathy Campbell for writing this post for the Highland blog. You can reach Cathy at&nbsp;<a href="mailto:%20ccampbell@highlandschool.org" target="_self">ccampbell@highlandschool.org</a></em></i></i></div> Thu, 26 Oct 2017 00:00:00 EST "The Play's the Thing": Approaching Shakespeare the Harmon Way https://www.highlandschool.org/page.cfm?p=840&eid=98 <p><img src="uploaded/themes/default/images/students.in.chilton.jpg" width="1000" height="750"></p> <p>For Dr. John Harmon, planning his language arts curriculum includes scanning the events listing at area theaters. The practice goes back five years, when his seventh grade class read Oscar Wilde&rsquo;s &ldquo;The Importance of Being Earnest&rdquo; and then saw it performed in Washington D.C. It was a resounding success. &ldquo;Plays are meant to be seen, of course,&rdquo; remarks Harmon, &ldquo;and it was an amazing experience for them in terms of what it added to their understanding of Wilde&rsquo;s language and wit. I wanted my students to see the play we read every year.&rdquo;&nbsp; Since then, Harmon has moved to teaching eighth grade and makes his yearly Shakespeare selection based on the local availability of the production.</p> <p class="fs_style_27"><span>"We begin our instruction with some English history and background on Shakespeare. Each week, students read a section of the play. During class time, we discuss the reading, act out scenes, perhaps watch a selection from a movie, and create a visual representation of each act."</span></p> <p><span>In past years, Highland eighth graders have seen &ldquo;A Midsummer Night&rsquo;s Dream&rdquo; (Shakespeare Theater Company), &ldquo;As You Like It&rdquo; (The Folger Theater), and &ldquo;Macbeth&rdquo; (Shakespeare Theater Company).&nbsp; Last year&rsquo;s &ldquo;Macbeth,&rdquo; an edgy, action-packed production set in Africa rather than Scotland, gave students plenty to discuss. Harmon prepares them well. &ldquo;We begin our instruction with some English history and background on Shakespeare. Each week, students read a section of the play. During class time, we discuss the reading, act out scenes, perhaps watch a selection from a movie, and create a visual representation of each act."</span></p> <p>Harmon goes all-in, utilizing the widest variety of resources to engage his students. He takes advantage of educational specialists made available by the theaters, who travel to conduct classroom workshops at Highland. Last year, he found &ldquo;Macbeth&rdquo; in graphic novel form and added that to their study. The students were riveted. For most, Harmon&rsquo;s class serves as their first introduction to the Bard. He comments: &ldquo;My goal is to have the students finish reading the play before we see it, so they are completely familiar with key literary elements, such as plot, setting, and characters. This deep understanding allows them to truly enjoy the performance and get the most out of it.&rdquo;</p> <p>Like any great teacher, Harmon is also a student. This summer, he attended the Hudson Valley Shakespeare Teacher Institute in New York, an experience he describes as &ldquo;incredible.&rdquo;</p> <p>For the upcoming year, Harmon plans to teach &ldquo;Macbeth&rdquo; again. Usually, he avoids teaching the same play consecutively, but he &ldquo;broke the pattern&rdquo; when he discovered the play was being staged at the Blackfriar&rsquo;s Playhouse in Staunton, Virginia &ndash; the world&rsquo;s only recreation of Shakespeare&rsquo;s own indoor theater. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s too good an opportunity to pass up,&rdquo; he says.<span style="font-size: 1.0625em;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p>Getting students out of the classroom and into the theater requires extra legwork, including orchestrating 7:30 a.m. departures in order to make the matinee. But Harmon believes the extra effort is well worth it. &ldquo;We live in such a culturally rich area, yet few students see live theater these days. At Highland, teachers have the ability to adapt the curriculum to the student. In too many schools, unfortunately, it&rsquo;s the other way around. Here, we&rsquo;re fully invested in experiential education and engaged learning. My approach simply capitalizes on that.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>Check out the trailer from the production of Macbeth the class saw in 2017:</p> <iframe width="800" height="600" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/wybkRiAbycI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe> <p><span style="font-size: small;"><i><i><em>Thanks to Cathy Campbell for writing this post for the Highland blog. You can reach Cathy at&nbsp;<a href="mailto:%20ccampbell@highlandschool.org" target="_self">ccampbell@highlandschool.org</a></em></i></i></span></p> Mon, 18 Sep 2017 12:06:55 EST Girl Up Club Members Advocate for Legislative Change https://www.highlandschool.org/page.cfm?p=840&eid=97 <a href="https://spark.adobe.com/page/8SlOJUCm8WGil/?w=0_3968" target="_blank"><img src="uploaded/themes/default/images/girl.up.promo.screen.jpg" width="1350" height="821"></a> <div></div> <div>Upper School students, led by Claire Olson '18, are making a difference by advocating for legislative change. <a href="https://spark.adobe.com/page/8SlOJUCm8WGil/?w=0_3968" target="_blank">Click here to check out their story!</a></div> <div></div> Tue, 06 Jun 2017 08:25:16 EST Highland Students Design, Build, and Test Rocket Engine https://www.highlandschool.org/page.cfm?p=840&eid=96 <a href="https://spark.adobe.com/page/4U6B0uyzZe0Ud/?w=0_8601" target="_blank"><img src="uploaded/themes/default/images/rocket.cover.image.for.blog.jpg" width="1000" height="588"></a> <div></div> <div>Dr. Pat Hewitt and his AP Physics students too their lab project to a new level this year by designing, building, and testing their own Solid Fuel Ramjet rocket engine. The project was a partnership with Aerojet Rocketdyne, the University of Virginia, and the United States Army. <a href="https://spark.adobe.com/page/4U6B0uyzZe0Ud/?w=0_8601" target="_blank">Check out their story!</a></div> Mon, 05 Jun 2017 15:42:19 EST A Portrait of the Writer as a Young Woman https://www.highlandschool.org/page.cfm?p=840&eid=95 <p><i style="font-size: 1.0625em;"><img src="uploaded/themes/default/images/jenna.devaney.1000.jpg" width="1000" height="668"></i></p> <p><i style="font-size: 1.0625em;">The ancient immrama are tapestries woven by voices around a fire. A single thread always takes the first step to shape a larger image. As it travels through a storyteller&rsquo;s fingers, it&rsquo;ll braid, intertwine with others until they become one. Without that first thread, a story is nothing but an empty loom.&nbsp;</i></p> <p><i>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; -- excerpt from The Isle at the End of the World</i></p> <p>Highland junior Jenna Devanney might be the winning protagonist of her own narrative this year, based on the accolades she has recently accrued. She placed first in Highland&rsquo;s Flash Fiction contest with her piece, &ldquo;Sonder on 59<sup>th</sup> Street.&rdquo; A short story, &ldquo;The Pursuit,&rdquo; was a national winner in The Scholastic Art and Writing Awards&mdash;a designation earned by only 1% of the 330,000 art and writing entrants <a href="http://www.artandwriting.org/media/360344/" target="_blank">(check out the full story here)</a>. And, in her free time, Jenna is revising final drafts of her novel, <i>The Isle at the End of the World</i>. The novel, (think Irish folklore meets science fiction), is Book One in a planned trilogy. She hopes to find a publisher.</p> <p>As a seventh grader at Highland, Jenna read Pat Murphy&rsquo;s <i>Wild Girls</i>, a young adult novel about two teen girls who are writers and rule breakers. Although she had written short stories for some time, <i>Wild Girls</i> &ldquo;really inspired me to write more.&rdquo; She started &ldquo;writing seriously&rdquo; at age 14. Today, she counts Zora Neale Hurston, Oscar Wilde, and William Butler Yeats as particularly influential writers: Hurston for her evocative prose, Wilde for his biting wit, and Yeats for his deep love of country. Wilde and Yeats, of course, are Irish. Which bring us to the importance of Ireland.</p> <p>Jenna has been visiting family in County Sligo since she was a young child. &ldquo;The language and landscapes I saw, and the folklore that went with them, were always very intriguing to me,&rdquo; she notes. National winner &ldquo;The Pursuit&rdquo; was inspired by an ancient Irish epic; <i>The Isle at the End of the World</i> evolved from legends she heard as a child and her &ldquo;desire to know more about the country&rsquo;s history.&rdquo; At this point, Jenna is an expert on Celtic lore and language, having made both the focus of intense study. Maxine, the feisty heroine of &ldquo;The Isle at the End of the World,&rdquo; seems to speak for Jenna when she says:</p> <p><i>I knew all the myths. I knew each cairn by name. I&rsquo;d explored the mysterious chambers of Carrowkeel and the windswept heights of Keshcorran. I&rsquo;d traversed miles of rocky coves and fog-shrouded beaches below, where azure harbors flooded inland, clashing with the bold shape of Benbulben, the towering limestone ridge dominating the landscape.</i></p> <p>Jenna started writing <i>The Isle at the End of the World</i> in December 2014 and finished her first draft almost exactly a year later. Editing has been an integral part of the writing process and she credits Highland&rsquo;s English department with refining her critical reading and writing skills. &ldquo;I have gained an enormous amount from Highland&rsquo;s English classes,&rdquo; she comments. &ldquo;What I've learned about analyzing other author's books is always helpful in reflecting on my own work and trying to make it better.&rdquo;</p> <p>What does the future hold for Jenna? She had to decline Scholastic&rsquo;s invitation to a Carnegie Hall winner&rsquo;s event in June as she&rsquo;s traveling to Mexico to study Mayan ruins. As a rising senior, she is thinking about college and, not surprisingly, would like to attend university in Ireland. Working with horses and drawing are two additional passions that she cultivates. And she will continue her practice of writing every day, especially if the forecast calls for rain. &ldquo;I love to write on rainy or overcast days,&rdquo; she says, &ldquo;because they just seem to set the creative mood a little better than sunny days.&rdquo; &nbsp;Rain or sun, prizes or not, Jenna will continue to write. Like many writers, she is driven to do it and what&rsquo;s more, she comments, &ldquo;it makes me happy.&rdquo;</p> <p>Young and talented, Jenna&rsquo;s writing future is bright and one can&rsquo;t help but feel that we&rsquo;ll be reading reviews of her work someday. To quote a line from her own novel: <i>&ldquo;Brace yourself, my friend. This is my beginning.&rdquo;</i></p> <p><i><a href="http://www.artandwriting.org/media/360344/" target="_blank">Click here to&nbsp;read the complete text of 'The Pursuit' from the Scholastic Art &amp; Writing Awards website.</a></i></p> <p><span style="font-size: small;"><i><i><em>Thanks to Cathy Campbell for writing this post for the Highland blog. You can reach Cathy at <a href="mailto:%20ccampbell@highlandschool.org" target="_self">ccampbell@highlandschool.org</a></em></i></i></span></p> Tue, 18 Apr 2017 09:49:04 EST The Many Layers of Highland's Butterfly Garden https://www.highlandschool.org/page.cfm?p=840&eid=93 <p>There&rsquo;s more to Highland&rsquo;s new monarch butterfly garden than a lovely display of native plants and flitting butterflies. Intended in both design and execution as an essential way station for migrating monarch butterflies struggling to find food, the garden is the culmination of months of work by Lower School students, faculty, and parents. But it doesn&rsquo;t just meet the needs of the insects &ndash; it meets the needs and interests of the students and teachers as well.</p> <p><img src="uploaded/themes/default/images/garden.blog.photo.jpg" width="1000" height="668"></p> <p><em>&ldquo;Happiness is a butterfly, which when pursued, is always just beyond your grasp, but which, if you sit down quietly, may alight upon you.&rdquo;&nbsp;</em><span style="font-size: small;">- Nathaniel Hawthorne, American Novelist</span></p> <p>For centuries, the mysterious butterfly has appeared throughout literature, world culture and religion, and has been falsely viewed as fragile and fleeting. In reality, the monarch butterfly is pretty tough and has endured despite threats to its environment and only food source&hellip;until now. Things are changing; the regal monarch&rsquo;s future is in jeopardy.&nbsp;</p> <p><span class="fs_style_39">Last year's first-graders took butterflies under their wings</span><br>When Highland&rsquo;s first graders learned that the monarchs&rsquo; numbers were historically low, they decided they must help the plight of these magical creatures, who do more than pollinate flowers and flit around looking breathtakingly beautiful. The students became enamored. Even though butterflies live from merely weeks to a few months, their lives are fascinating and packed full of activity. Fourth generation monarchs overwinter in Mexico and that&rsquo;s a long way to fly for individuals who undergo their transformation in Virginia! No wonder our curious students were propelled into action.&nbsp;</p> <p><span class="fs_style_39">From pupae to release, butterflies inspire questions</span><br>For the past ten years, the Lower School&rsquo;s Mary Chrisinger has shared milkweed laden with monarch caterpillars with students. Early last fall, Mrs. Solms&rsquo; students watched monarch pupae metamorphose into butterflies, prompting many questions about their insect friends&rsquo; lives, safety and migration. A trip to the Lower School library to see Mrs. Banse answered many of their questions about the life cycle and migration of the seemingly fragile souls, but prompted more queries. Realization set in and the children quickly made a list of what they needed to do to help save this species.&nbsp;</p> <p><span class="fs_style_39">Preoccupation with butterflies is not unusual</span><br>Preoccupation with the butterfly is not unusual. Butterfly lore indicates many cultures throughout the world regard the amazing insect to be a symbol for the human soul and have thought that way since ancient times. Aristotle referred to the butterfly as &lsquo;psyche&rsquo; and many writings have them conveying spiritual messages, as well as in artwork where souls frequently are painted with butterfly wings. It is the butterfly&rsquo;s metamorphosis that symbolizes spiritual transformation in many faiths&mdash;from egg to caterpillar, to pupa, to rebirth as a delicate-looking winged being. The monarch, or Mariposa as it is called in Spanish, has been termed the &ldquo;Symbol of Hope&rdquo; and of healing, as well as the &ldquo;Magic of Believing.&rdquo; The image is often portrayed in medical literature.</p> <p><span class="fs_style_39">How can we help?</span><br> The unwavering belief of the students that they could help these innocent beings was contagious and spread like western wildfires through Highland. Teachers reached out to experts. Dr. Marie Majorov, a photographer and monarch butterfly expert, visited to share her photographs and expertise with the Lower School. She helped the young ones understand the life cycle of the monarch, how critical their situation was, and how the students could help. Their immediate solution: build a garden to supply the monarchs with what they needed most&mdash;organic milkweed!</p> <p>Highland parents generously offered their labor and expertise to the project. First grade father and farmer, Sid Rodgers, arrived on a brilliant May morning with an excavator and dug the garden. He taught the children how to lay and care for the sod around the edges. Landscape architect and Highland mom, Katherine Ellsworth, helped the children see the importance of garden design, creating paths and plantings to form the shape of a butterfly. Ms. Ellsworth rolled up her sleeves and helped the children plant the milkweed and nectar-providing perennials that the butterflies require.&nbsp;</p> <p><span class="fs_style_39">Garden designated as official monarch way station</span><br>The garden, located at the front of the Lower School, is now recognized as an official Monarch Way station by Monarch Watch for migrating monarchs who pass through the area. It&rsquo;s likened to a bed and breakfast, but for the monarch set that flies hundreds of miles to Mexico for the winter.</p> <p>Students throughout the Lower School returned to campus this September to find hatching caterpillars metamorphosing into adults, storing up body fat from nectar as they prepared for their migration journey. The children studied the caterpillars, collected and reported data on the numbers they observed, and they tagged and released more than 80 monarchs, in hopes of tracking them to Mexico and watching the cycle begin again next year.</p> <p><span class="fs_style_39">"Watching the soar into the sky"</span><br> One Pre-K 4/5 student remarked, &ldquo;We hope they make it to Mexico!&rdquo; A Kindergartner&rsquo;s favorite part of the program was &ldquo;watching them soar&nbsp;into the sky&rdquo; upon release in the garden.&nbsp;</p> <p>Monarch mania spread with Lower School classrooms and offices displaying the miraculous tales of these amazing creatures. The monarch curriculum connects students with the animal world, thus allowing teachers to take a cross curricular approach to the subject and to the natural world. The program reflects the school&rsquo;s philosophy on experiential learning and has provided countless &ldquo;teachable moments.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p><span class="fs_style_39">Young advocates write letters to local officials</span><br>First graders applied their knowledge of the monarch to something greater than their classroom. They participated in a letter-writing campaign to encourage local public places to let native milkweed grow for the butterflies, instead of mowing it or spraying it with deadly herbicides, thus destroying the main food source for the winged creatures. The children hatched an idea, created a plan, carried the plan through and effected change.&nbsp;</p> <p>The magic that comes with the butterfly is believed throughout the world and is summed up by the old Irish blessing:</p> <p><em>&ldquo;May the wings of the butterfly kiss the sun, and find your shoulder to light on To bring you luck, happiness and riches today, tomorrow and beyond.&rdquo;</em></p> <p><span style="font-size: small;"><i><em>Thanks to Lora Mackie for writing this article, which originally appeared in the fall issue of Highland Magazine.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.highlandschool.org/page.cfm?p=778" target="_blank">Check out the complete issue here.</a></em></i></span></p> <div><span><br></span></div> <div></div> Thu, 28 Jan 2016 20:15:05 EST Highland's Kindergarten Students Drive Learning with Technology https://www.highlandschool.org/page.cfm?p=840&eid=92 <p>If you were to pop into the Highland Kindergarten classroom today, you would probably hear one of Diana Hewitt&rsquo;s serious five-year-olds comment to a classmate, &ldquo;That&rsquo;s a great piece of work, you should upload that to your Seesaw journal!&rdquo; That&rsquo;s right, you won&rsquo;t hear them talking about Dick, Jane and Spot as you might have 50+ years ago.</p> <p><img src="uploaded/themes/default/images/ipad.blog.post.image.jpg" width="1000" height="668"></p> <p>The new Seesaw e-Portfolio program that Mrs. Hewitt and Technology teacher Michele Daniel-Shenk are piloting in Kindergarten definitely makes it a 21st century classroom, which is an important reflection of the Highland mission.&nbsp;</p> <p><span class="fs_style_39">What is an e-Porfolio?</span><br> For those who may not know what an e-Portfolio is, it is a student-driven digital portfolio that empowers students to document independently what they learn at school. Many people may conjure up an image of the &ldquo;old fashioned art portfolio,&rdquo; which was basically a large cardboard folder that contained a collection of a student&rsquo;s artwork. An e-portfolio is an electronic file that encompasses a collection of many types of student work. It might contain photos, videos, drawings, various education apps, text notes, and math problems among other things.&nbsp;</p> <p><span class="fs_style_39">Technology puts emphasis on needs of each student<b><br> </b></span>At Highland, the new iPad program is taking Kindergarten by storm and is changing the culture of teaching in the classroom. &ldquo;The new iPads enrich my students and expand their learning,&rdquo; Mrs. Hewitt declared recently. &ldquo;It gives enormous support for those needing additional learning opportunities and I can use applications to target very specific, individualized needs, both with enrichment and remedial tasks,&rdquo; she continued. &ldquo;My reward is to facilitate my students&rsquo; learning by setting up experiences and then watch them discover the concepts on their own,&rdquo; she said proudly. &ldquo;I am creating problem solvers and critical thinkers who collaborate and teach each other.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p class="fs_style_27">By no means is the technology a substitution for writing manually in their paper journals or using manipulatives for math. &ldquo;We build upon what we already do and then connect it to the technology,&rdquo; Mrs. Hewitt explained. She clarified that Seesaw and the use of iPads are tools that the children use&mdash;&ldquo;Starting with pencils, markers, crayons and then iPads!&rdquo; Mrs. Hewitt exclaimed, &ldquo;iPads are not toys and the children do not play games on them.&rdquo;</p> <p>By no means is the technology a substitution for writing manually in their paper journals or using manipulatives for math. &ldquo;We build upon what we already do and then connect it to the technology,&rdquo; Mrs. Hewitt explained. She clarified that Seesaw and the use of iPads are tools that the children use&mdash;&ldquo;Starting with pencils, markers, crayons and then iPads!&rdquo; Mrs. Hewitt exclaimed, &ldquo;iPads are not toys and the children do not play games on them.&rdquo; &nbsp;</p> <p>A distinct advantage of using e-Portfolios is that they connect parents directly with their children&rsquo;s educations. &ldquo;We communicate with parents routinely through a personalized window,&rdquo; Mrs. Hewitt said. Parents can open their own child&rsquo;s folder to see what they do at school each day.</p> <p>Using this as one method in the classroom connects the child with the parent, connects home with school,&rdquo; Mrs. Hewitt said. &ldquo;It is thrilling to see.&rdquo;</p> <p>Why Seesaw? Mrs. Daniel-Shenk said she has always liked the idea of students keeping portfolios of their work. &ldquo;As a parent, I love the idea of being able to look back at my child&rsquo;s work and see how they have progressed over the years,&rdquo; she said. She sees the program as an invaluable motivational tool too. &ldquo;Students can record what they are doing and over time will be able to see how they improve.&rdquo;</p> <p><span class="fs_style_39">Students can share classwork instantly</span><br> Mrs. Daniel-Shenk believes there is no better tool with which to share schoolwork with parents. &ldquo;Students of all ages often say they did nothing in school when asked by their parents. Seesaw allows us to take snapshots of the child&rsquo;s day and share it with parents.&rdquo; For instance, she can record a song they&rsquo;ve worked on in music class or share how the children programmed a robot in technology class.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;&ldquo;I feel like the Seesaw website gives me the opportunity to view my daughter&rsquo;s accomplishments on a daily basis,&rdquo; says Khadar Ahmed, Amira Mohamed&rsquo;s father. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m in Monrovia, Liberia, and I have to say Seesaw is amazing. I just spent an hour going through the pictures and audio.&rdquo; The program keeps Mr. Ahmed actively involved with Amira&rsquo;s work when he is so far from home.&nbsp;</p> <p><span class="fs_style_39">Every Kindergartner has an iPad</span><br> Each Kindergartner has his/her own iPad this year. &ldquo;My favorite aspect is that the students take ownership for their own learning and with one-to-one devices, their learning has blossomed into far more than I could have imagined at the Kindergarten level,&rdquo; Mrs. Hewitt added. &ldquo;With Seesaw, my students have a place to showcase their work and they have no limits on what they can share with their families.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>Even though the Seesaw program is designed for grades K-12, it is a child-friendly, safe program that only parents can view. Privacy is of the utmost importance and the teacher is always in control and has to approve all of the work that the children upload to their individual folders. Mrs. Hewitt adds information each day on what the class is doing. For instance, on a recent field studies trip, she took a picture of the group when they arrived at their destination and posted updates so the parents could see what they were doing. Each time there is an update on the site, parents receive an alert on their telephones. Mrs. Hewitt receives a report each week from Seesaw that shows how many parents have gone to their children&rsquo;s folders and she reads comments that the parents leave when they &ldquo;visit&rdquo; their children&rsquo;s folders.&nbsp;</p> <p>During the first week of school the students learned all about the buttons on their iPads and each week in technology class they learn new applications and technology terms. The beauty of the program is that the iPads are mobile and can be taken anywhere. For example, students took them to science class one day and photographed the new chicks that had hatched. Students are able to voice record on their posts too and as they become more advanced at writing, they write observations, stories and comments.</p> <p><span class="fs_style_39">Reflecting on their own work adds to students' ciritcal thinking skills</span>&nbsp;<br>The goal of the program is to start with Kindergarten and build on the foundation each year. &ldquo;As a teacher, I get to see the development process, which is very exciting,&rdquo; Mrs. Hewitt volunteered. Another important component of the process is that it gives students a chance to regularly reflect on their work. By reflecting on what they have learned and figuring out how they plan to build and improve upon their work, children become better critical thinkers, which in turn, helps them with their writing and multi-media skills. Students&rsquo; learning is advanced by organizing, archiving and displaying their work.</p> <p>It isn&rsquo;t unusual for Mrs. Hewitt or a student to suggest that the children should post something to their folders. &ldquo;The children love the program and really like going through their e-Portfolios to see what they have done,&rdquo; she added.&nbsp;</p> <p>The idea to use one-to-one iPads in Kindergarten was hatched by Mrs. Daniel-Shenk and Mrs. Hewitt last year. They applied for a Faculty Fellowship Proposal because they wanted to write and pilot a new curriculum that integrated hands on learning activities with iPad applications. They liked the idea of being able to adapt learning to the individual student&rsquo;s learning style. They attended workshops and visited other independent schools that use iPads in similar ways. Their goal was to &ldquo;Create and implement a technology enhanced Kindergarten framework that promotes an educational philosophy in which technology is integrated into the curriculum through active, student-centered learning.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>Mrs. Daniel-Shenk&rsquo;s dream is &ldquo;To see the iPads program expand to having 1-to-1 iPads throughout the Lower School.&rdquo; She and Mrs. Hewitt have taken additional training in the use of the Seesaw program and have officially been named Seesaw Ambassadors. As such, they have spoken at other schools and share their experiences on social media. They have presented workshops at the Teachers Leading Teachers Conference, as well. Having been a former Kindergarten teacher before joining Highland, Mrs. Daniel-Shenk and Mrs. Hewitt make a great team and were the ideal pair to introduce this pilot program to the Kindergarten class.</p> <p><span style="font-size: small;"><em>Thanks to Lora Mackie for writing this article, which originally appeared in the fall issue of Highland Magazine. <a href="http://www.highlandschool.org/page.cfm?p=778" target="_blank">Check out the complete issue here.</a></em></span></p> <div><span><br></span></div> <div></div> Thu, 28 Jan 2016 00:00:00 EST Highland Alum Tori Hall '13 Addresses Students and Faculty https://www.highlandschool.org/page.cfm?p=840&eid=87 <div id="cp_widget_fd399029-d26d-458b-9c17-e4e026f76afc"><img src="uploaded/themes/default/images/tori.hall.800.jpg" width="800" height="534"></div> <div></div> <p>At a recent All-School Gathering, Victoria Hall, the valedictorian of Highland's Class of 2013 and a current student at Yale University, addressed students, faculty and parents. In her speech, which you can watch below, Tori encouraged current students to take full advantage of the unique range of opportunities Highland offers &ndash; everything from the academics, athletics, and arts, to the highly individualized attention from its dedicated faculty.</p> <p>Tori mentioned two faculty members specifically who encouraged her to push beyond her own perceived limits while fostering her love of learning and embracing own individual talents and interests. To learn more about Tori and the two faculty members who she credits with her academic success, check out the full video of Tori's captivating and motivation speech by clicking the link. <span style="font-size: 1.0625em; line-height: 1.52941;">&nbsp;</span></p> <div></div> <div>...</div> <p> <script type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ var cpo = []; cpo["_object"] ="cp_widget_fd399029-d26d-458b-9c17-e4e026f76afc"; cpo["_fid"] = "AgEA0W8R-PWg!Ac6Cc92gtZ2A"; var _cpmp = _cpmp || []; _cpmp.push(cpo); (function() { var cp = document.createElement("script"); cp.type = "text/javascript"; cp.async = true; cp.src = "//www.cincopa.com/media-platform/runtime/libasync.js"; var c = document.getElementsByTagName("script")[0]; c.parentNode.insertBefore(cp, c); })(); // ]]></script> </p> <noscript>Powered by Cincopa &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;a href="//www.cincopa.com/video-hosting"&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt;Video Hosting for Business&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;/a&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;gt; solution.</noscript> Mon, 24 Aug 2015 11:08:31 EST Upper School Students Complete Service Camp https://www.highlandschool.org/page.cfm?p=840&eid=86 <p><span lang="en-us"><img src="uploaded/themes/default/images/service.camp.cover.800.jpg" width="800" height="560"></span></p> <p><span lang="en-us">Highland Upper School students, Luke Rodgers, Tucker Minter, Ben Babcox, Brooke Landers, and Cameron Smith spent a week of their summer volunteering for community organizations and earning hours toward their service requirement.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span lang="en-us" style="font-size: 1.0625em; line-height: 1.52941;"><span face="Calibri"><span class="fs_style_34">Students performed a wide range of jobs during the week</span><br></span></span>On Monday, students loaded shelves, sorted produce, and help ready the Fauquier Food Bank for their clients. On Tuesday, students weeded and mulched flower beds and a playground for families at The Barn, a Transitional Housing program in Prince William County.&nbsp; On Wednesday, students caulked and painted alongside other volunteers, including two Highland grandparents of alumni at Fauquier Habitat for Humanity&rsquo;s build site in Warrenton.<br><span lang="en-us"></span></p> <div id="cp_widget_02f2395a-6ec8-4e9d-acb8-ba142b791f9c">...</div> <script type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ var cpo = []; cpo["_object"] ="cp_widget_02f2395a-6ec8-4e9d-acb8-ba142b791f9c"; cpo["_fid"] = "AMOAY0ceEQ7P"; var _cpmp = _cpmp || []; _cpmp.push(cpo); (function() { var cp = document.createElement("script"); cp.type = "text/javascript"; cp.async = true; cp.src = "//www.cincopa.com/media-platform/runtime/libasync.js"; var c = document.getElementsByTagName("script")[0]; c.parentNode.insertBefore(cp, c); })(); // ]]></script> <noscript>Powered by Cincopa &amp;lt;a href='http://www.cincopa.com/video-hosting'&amp;gt;Video Hosting for Business&amp;lt;/a&amp;gt; solution.&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;Upper School Service Camp&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramake&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;height&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 3456&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;orientation&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 1&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;flash&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 16&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;originaldate&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 7/14/2015 3:31:56 PM&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;width&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 5184&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramodel&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon EOS REBEL T3i&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramake&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;height&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 3456&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;orientation&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 1&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;flash&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 16&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;originaldate&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 7/15/2015 4:26:36 PM&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;width&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 5184&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramodel&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon EOS REBEL T3i&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramake&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;height&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 3456&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;orientation&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 1&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;flash&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 16&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;originaldate&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 7/15/2015 4:53:41 PM&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;width&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 5184&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramodel&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 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1&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;flash&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 16&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;originaldate&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 7/16/2015 2:51:13 PM&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;width&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 5184&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramodel&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon EOS REBEL T3i&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramake&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;height&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 3456&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;orientation&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 1&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;flash&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 16&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;originaldate&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 7/16/2015 2:51:38 PM&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;width&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 5184&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramodel&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon EOS REBEL T3i&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramake&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;height&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 3456&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;orientation&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 1&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;flash&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 16&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;originaldate&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 7/16/2015 4:26:54 PM&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;width&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 5184&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramodel&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon EOS REBEL T3i&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramake&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;height&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 3456&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;orientation&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 1&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;flash&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 16&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;originaldate&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 7/16/2015 4:27:39 PM&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;width&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 5184&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramodel&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon EOS REBEL T3i&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramake&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;height&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 3456&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;orientation&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 1&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;flash&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 16&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;originaldate&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 7/17/2015 4:24:09 PM&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;width&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 5184&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramodel&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon EOS REBEL T3i&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramake&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;height&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 3456&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;orientation&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 1&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;flash&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 16&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;originaldate&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 7/17/2015 4:24:45 PM&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;width&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 5184&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramodel&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon EOS REBEL T3i&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;flash&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 9&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramake&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;height&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 5184&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;orientation&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 1&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;camerasoftware&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Microsoft Windows Ph&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;originaldate&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 7/13/2015 2:20:05 PM&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;width&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 3456&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramodel&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon EOS REBEL T3i&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;flash&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 16&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramake&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;height&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 5184&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;orientation&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 1&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;camerasoftware&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Microsoft Windows Ph&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;originaldate&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 7/14/2015 3:31:44 PM&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;width&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 3456&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramodel&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon EOS REBEL T3i&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;flash&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 16&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramake&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;height&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 5184&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;orientation&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 1&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;camerasoftware&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Microsoft Windows Ph&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;originaldate&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 7/15/2015 1:49:28 PM&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;width&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 3456&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramodel&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon EOS REBEL T3i&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;flash&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 9&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramake&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;height&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 5184&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;orientation&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 1&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;camerasoftware&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Microsoft Windows Ph&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;originaldate&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 7/15/2015 1:59:35 PM&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;width&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 3456&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramodel&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon EOS REBEL T3i&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;flash&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 16&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramake&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;height&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 5184&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;orientation&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 1&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;camerasoftware&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Microsoft Windows Ph&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;originaldate&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 7/15/2015 2:08:39 PM&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;width&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 3456&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramodel&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon EOS REBEL T3i&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;flash&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 16&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramake&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;height&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 5184&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;orientation&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 1&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;camerasoftware&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Microsoft Windows Ph&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;originaldate&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 7/15/2015 4:36:52 PM&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;width&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 3456&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramodel&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon EOS REBEL T3i&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;flash&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 16&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramake&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;height&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 5184&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;orientation&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 1&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;camerasoftware&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Microsoft Windows Ph&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;originaldate&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 7/16/2015 4:26:50 PM&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;width&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; 3456&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt;cameramodel&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;&amp;lt;span&amp;gt; Canon EOS REBEL T3i&amp;lt;/span&amp;gt;</noscript> <p>On Thursday, students revitalized a Discovery Garden at Vint Hill Transitional Housing in partnership with Grow, Learn and Thrive, a non-profit dedicated to &ldquo;helping at-risk children thrive through each developmental phase of their first five years.&rdquo; They finished up the week refinishing some furniture for a single mom and her three children moving into Vint Hill Transitional Housing, who otherwise have no furniture.</p> <p><span lang="en-us"><span face="Calibri"><span class="fs_style_34">A new appreciation for the work of local non-profits</span><br></span></span>At each site, students learned about the mission of each community organization and the role they play and programs they offer to combat poverty. They are a hardworking, positive, and thoughtful bunch!<br></p> <p><span lang="en-us"><span face="Calibri"></span></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span lang="en-us"><span face="Calibri"></span></span></p> <div></div> <p><span lang="en-us"><span face="Calibri"><br></span></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Wed, 19 Aug 2015 17:07:10 EST Outward Bound with Highland School https://www.highlandschool.org/page.cfm?p=840&eid=83 <p><span style="font-size: 1.0625em; line-height: 1.52941; color: #29a6f5;"><img src="uploaded/themes/default/images/outward.bound.blog.photo.jpg" width="800" height="531"></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 1.0625em; line-height: 1.52941; color: #29a6f5;">&ldquo;If we take to heart the lessons of history, we will regard it as a very serious responsibility of schools to build up nervous strength in the vulnerable, the imaginative, the sensitive, by methods which will harden yet spare them, so that they will be better able to stand the strain which responsible citizenship imposes.&rdquo;</span><span style="font-size: 1.0625em; line-height: 1.52941;">&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>-KURT HAHN, OUTWARD BOUND</strong></span><span style="font-size: 1.0625em; line-height: 1.52941;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><em>Under the school&rsquo;s Character and Leadership program, Upper School students have the opportunity to pursue a Certificate of Leadership Development. Criteria for the certificate include completion of a Leadership and/or Social Justice elective course, holding three leadership positions, and completion of an expedition or project that demonstrates the student&rsquo;s development of their leadership capacity. In 2010, Highland began partnering with North Carolina Outward Bound to offer a summer 5-day backpacking and rock climbing trip in the Table Rock region of Pisgah National Forest as a complement to the school&rsquo;s existing Experiential Education and Leadership programs. What follows is a summary of the trip and the benefits this type of partnership offers to the school, the faculty chaperone, and participating students.</em></p> <p>Lucas had been up there on that rock face for 15 minutes. Despite being terrified of heights, he&rsquo;d mustered enough courage to strap on the climbing gear and clamber his way up the first section of aptly-named Devil&rsquo;s Cellar. Built more for facing opponents on the lacrosse field than for shimmying up cliffs, his hefty frame shook slightly as he perched on a narrow strip of rock. Minutes passed as he considered which was scarier &ndash;making another attempt at climbing up, or trusting his belayer to lower him down.</p> <p><span class="fs_style_34">Which choice do you make?</span><br>Pivotal moments like these leave an indelible impression on those who are a part of them and provides data about important questions. As the climber, what do I say and do when confronted by a challenge? As a member of the team on the ground, how do I support my teammate in a way that they want to be supported? As an educator, once the moment is over, how can I help students transfer the lesson learned to future challenges and experiences? My trip with 10 students this summer to the Table Rock region of Pisgah National Forest produced many pivotal moments for each of us to reflect on these questions, struggle against obstacles, celebrate overcoming challenges, and practice supporting each other.</p> <p><span class="fs_style_34">Institutional benefits</span><br>While the trip had obvious and significant impacts on each of us who participated, a program like this provides great benefits for our school. Highland works closely with North Carolina Outward Bound (NCOB) to plan trip curriculum based on our school's programmatic goals, current issues in our school community, and which students are coming on the trip. Because there is significant overlap with the Outward Bound reflective process and organizational values, and the academic and extra-curricular program Highland offers, lessons learned on the trip are easily transferable to our everyday school experience. This trip benefits Highland School in three main ways:</p> <ul> <li>Building a cohort of students&nbsp;in the Upper School community who have a shared intensive outdoor experience that emphasizes stewardship, personal development, leadership, teamwork and leadership, who can then use their perspectives and skills to positively impact their classrooms, teams, clubs and social groups.<br>&nbsp;</li> <li>Developing a cadre of faculty&nbsp;who also have a common professional development experience where they can learn backcountry trip leadership and group facilitation skills from seasoned Outward Bound instructors. Because a different faculty member chaperones the trip each year, we have more faculty who bring these skills to our field studies programs during the academic year.<br>&nbsp;</li> <li>Serving as a complement to our Experiential and Leadership programs.&nbsp;This trip is challenging physically and mentally. From start to finish participants are pushed out of their comfort zone. This environment allows leadership capabilities and team dynamics to develop at an accelerated pace and intensity, providing great lessons for us to draw upon throughout the school year.</li> </ul> <p><span class="fs_style_34">Faculty members learn from the experience</span><br>Each of the faculty members who has chaperoned this trip would jump at the chance to do it again. For me, there were numerous personal and professional gains.</p> <p>This trip gave me&nbsp;time to think,&nbsp;specifically, two and half hours straight of uninterrupted, undistracted time in my own head during our &ldquo;solo&rdquo; reflection. Since having children, I can&rsquo;t recall 2 &frac12; minutes of continuous silence. I would chaperone again in a heartbeat, if only for those beautifully silent hours. I used it to reflect on my year at school, my year with my family, and to articulate and journal about my core values, a process our Leadership Seminar students engage in as they draft, finalize and present This I Believe speeches.</p> <p>From our superb course instructors, I picked up a slew of&nbsp;teaching tools: icebreakers, facilitation techniques, reflection activities and readings, and ways to teach/frame camp craft lessons. The NCOB staff is incredibly talented at both backcountry trip logistics and group facilitation, creating an unforgettable experience for all of us.</p> <p>The most important benefit was the opportunity to&nbsp;get to know the ten Upper School students&nbsp;in a backcountry setting&nbsp;away from school and their regular peer groups. I saw more layers of their personalities and perspectives, learned more about each of their lives, families, and interests, and watched their individual strengths come to light.</p> <p class="fs_style_27">The most important benefit was the opportunity to&nbsp;get to know the ten Upper School students&nbsp;in a backcountry setting&nbsp;away from school and their regular peer groups. I saw more layers of their personalities and perspectives, learned more about each of their lives, families, and interests, and watched their individual strengths come to light.</p> <p><span style="font-size: 1.0625em; line-height: 1.52941;"><span class="fs_style_34">Students benefit from participation</span><br></span>Students self-select for this trip. Their reasons for doing the trip ranged from wanting to test their own limits, to doing it because a teacher said they should, to being &ldquo;strongly encouraged&rdquo; by their parents to go. Generally, the group that results is an eclectic one in terms of peer group membership and this year&rsquo;s group was no exception. They individually and collectively impressed me and our Outward Bound instructors. They bought-in fully to the experience, were willing to stretch their physical and mental comfort zones, supported each other beautifully, and were incredibly thoughtful and articulate in their observations, and take-aways.</p> <p>For many of them, it was one of the most challenging experiences they&rsquo;d had, and though some weren&rsquo;t sure they&rsquo;d do it again, they were all glad they had. One student&rsquo;s assertion that, &ldquo;Everyone&nbsp;needs&nbsp;to do this!&rdquo; was met with a chorus of &ldquo;YES!&rdquo; Whether physical, social, or emotional, each student&nbsp;overcame a personal challenge.&nbsp;</p> <p class="fs_style_28">One student&rsquo;s assertion that, &ldquo;Everyone&nbsp;needs&nbsp;to do this!&rdquo; was met with a chorus of &ldquo;YES!&rdquo;</p> <p>This trip was an opportunity to&nbsp;discover and use skills as leaders and effective team members.&nbsp;Each day, students selected specific roles outlined by our instructors, so they could practice being the group motivator, trail navigator, cook, or water guru. And beyond these specified roles students took on others as the trip and group dynamic demanded: mood lifter, pack mule, expert bear bag rope thrower, comforting encourager. Students are specifically asked to consider what lessons they will take away from the trip to apply to their student life and add value to the school community.</p> <p>Students also had&nbsp;time to think.&nbsp;If there was a frontrunner theme for their reflections, it was gratitude &ndash; for the experience, for each other, for nature, for a break from cell phones, for their parents. One young lady who deflected a public hug from her mom at the start of the trip said, &ldquo;I didn&rsquo;t realize how much my mom does for me. She really works hard &ndash; making lunches, taking care of the house, working. I should really let her know how thankful I am.&rdquo;</p> <p>Others verbalized, with a tone of relief, how nice it was not to be glued to their cellphones and the latest photo on Snapchat. One young man acknowledged that he&rsquo;d found a group of classmates he could trust to have his back &ndash; something he&rsquo;d struggled to identify prior to the trip. Another, in our closing ceremony, declined accepting his Outward Bound pin, earnestly noting that he wants to continue to working on becoming a better person. He&rsquo;ll accept his pin when&nbsp;he&nbsp;feels he&rsquo;s ready.</p> <p><span class="fs_style_34">Highland recognizes the value of the experience</span><br>I am proud that Highland recognizes and emphasizes the importance of offering experiences like this for our students, and am honored by the students who willingly participate fully them. In reality, we weren&rsquo;t out here long enough to test fully our personal limits or to expose and work through the more challenging stages of Tuckman&rsquo;s group dynamics. And though it was certainly difficult, it was a &ldquo;challenge by choice.&rdquo; Each of us knew our discomfort was temporary. That soon enough we&rsquo;d be on a bus back home to an air-conditioned home, warm shower, refrigerator full of food, cozy bed, our favorite people, and all the &ldquo;necessities&rdquo; of a comfortable life. But it was enough for now. Enough to make us grateful. Enough to make us think about others who face this or worse obstacles by circumstance rather than choice. Enough to set the stage for future challenges and conversations.</p> <p>Lucas, as it turns out, used a strategy that will be an excellent addition to his tool belt for life. He got down off the rock, took another look at it from below to reconsider his route, gave his body and mind a five minute break, then tried again. The second time, accompanied by the cheers of all of us below, he reached the top carabiner.</p> <p><span style="font-size: small;"><em>Megan Catalfamo is the Director of Experiential and Service Learning at Highland School.</em></span></p> Tue, 28 Jul 2015 20:08:39 EST Celebrating 32 Years with Sarah Roach https://www.highlandschool.org/page.cfm?p=840&eid=82 <p class="fs_style_29"><img src="uploaded/themes/default/images/sarah.in.classroom.800.jpg" width="800" height="534"></p> <p>After 32 years at Highland School, Upper School Latin teacher Sarah Roach will retire at the end of the 2015/2016 academic year (after climbing Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, of course). We caught up with Sarah to find out how she arrived at Highland, what she thinks about traveling the world with her students, and what adventures lie ahead.</p> <div> <p class="fs_style_39">Q. You came to Highland School in 1984 after teaching at Wakefield Country Day School. What originally brought you to Highland? Did you think at the time that you&rsquo;d stay for 32 years?</p> <p>A. I actually taught Latin for a year in a high school in Virginia Beach. I was right out of college and I didn&rsquo;t know if I wanted to teach Latin or English. I just knew I needed a job!</p> <p>As it turns out, in the early 1970&rsquo;s, Latin education was in decline. School systems were putting their resources into languages like French and German. At the time I graduated from college, Virginia was on the cutting-edge in classics education.&nbsp;</p> <p>Classicists knew they had to take drastic measures or Latin in the classroom was going to die. To increase interest among both students and school systems, they were writing new textbooks, instituting a national Latin exam, and encouraging schools to make Latin&nbsp;more interesting.</p> <p>In 1977, my husband and I moved to Rappahannock County and I started teaching at Wakefield Country Day School in Flint Hill. For six years, I taught Latin, Greek, Mythology, and English for students from 6th to 12th grades.&nbsp;</p> <p>By that time, I knew I was committed to teaching Latin. Interest in Latin was increasing as other languages were declining. At the same time, enrollment in private schools was increasing. I knew I was riding the wave of a renaissance in both the classics and private school education.</p> <p>In 1984, I came to Highland to work for William Osier, the Headmaster at the time. I taught Latin in the Middle School for 12 years. Did I know that I was going to be at Highland for 32 years? Absolutely. I love teaching, I love the students, I loved having my own daughters Morgan <i>(Class of 2003)</i> and Ryan <i>(Class of 2006) </i>attend school&nbsp;here with me. I just love the environment.</p> <p class="fs_style_39">Q. You moved to the Upper School when it originally opened in 1996. Did that change how you taught Latin after teaching at the Middle School level?</p> <p>A. When Highland opened the Upper School in 1996, David Plank, who was then the headmaster, asked me if I wanted to teach high school Latin. Frankly, I was getting tired of teaching Latin to Middle School students and I leapt at the chance to take on a new challenge. In Middle School, you&rsquo;re focused on the basics like grammar and vocabulary. You can&rsquo;t read Ovid with Middle Schoolers.</p> <p class="fs_style_39">Q. You were involved in the travel program in the Middle School, which was more conservative due to the younger students. Did the international travel program that is now so prominent in the Upper School evolve from that?</p> <p>A. I had done a bit of traveling with students while I was at Wakefield Country Day School and wanted to bring the experience to Highland. When I first started in the Middle School, we took a few international trips.&nbsp;</p> <p>When I got to the Upper School, I expanded the travel program. Travel &ndash; and especially international travel &ndash; broadens horizons. International travel is a lot more than just seeing. It&rsquo;s doing. Kids must manage a different currency, a different language, and a different culture.</p> <p>I don&rsquo;t go up to their room in the morning and wake them up for breakfast. They&rsquo;ve got to deal with getting up on time, roommates, navigating airports, and being where they are supposed to be on time. When students travel with me, they have to be responsible. And they usually do very well.</p> <p class="fs_style_39">Q. What has the opportunity to travel the world with your students meant to you? What does it mean to the students? What does it mean to Highland School?</p> <p>A. I want kids to travel and I do everything I can to encourage our families and students to participate in Highland&rsquo;s travel program. We typically get 20-25 students for each of our trips. For our more popular trips to Italy and Greece, we can get 30-35 students. In Italy, everyone loves the food, the cappuccino, the gelato. And it gives my Latin students an opportunity to see many of the cities and places we talk about during the year. I pack as much as I can into every trip to make sure students are getting the&nbsp;most out of the experience possible.</p> <p class="fs_style_39">Q. You are retiring after the 2015/2016 academic year, but not until you&rsquo;ve climbed Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania. What will retirement bring for you?&nbsp;</p> <p>A. My husband is an avid skier. We own property in Idaho and, at the end of the next school year, we will move there and build a house. My husband has traveled extensively in the western United States. While I&rsquo;ve traveled throughout Europe and up and down the east coast, I&rsquo;ve never traveled out west. I&rsquo;ve never been to the national parks like Yellowstone or Yosemite. We&rsquo;ll travel out there together.&nbsp;</p> <p>Will I miss teaching? While I&rsquo;m not the sentimental type,&nbsp;I&rsquo;ll miss teaching, yes, but I am ready to get on with&nbsp;the second half of my life.</p> <p>My only concern now is to make sure that Highland&rsquo;s Latin program continues to thrive. We currently have 60 Upper School students in the Latin program, and I want that popularity to continue after I&rsquo;m gone. I&rsquo;ve worked too hard over the last twenty years to build the program to where it is today. That&rsquo;s a significant investment in time and energy.</p> <p>I am actively involved in the process of hiring a new Latin teacher for Highland. I&rsquo;m looking forward to seeing what the future will bring.</p> <div></div> </div> Tue, 28 Jul 2015 20:07:53 EST